Oyster watch

Our underwater cameras have captured some exciting video footage from our oyster nurseries, teaming with life and supporting an incredible range of species. Now we need your help to monitor our oyster nurseries!

We would like you to watch the video clip and tell us about what you've seen

We have put together some information which will help you to identify some of the species you might see in the video!

    How many different fish species did you see?
    None1-34-6More than 6

    Please select the species you saw in the video:
    European eelSea bass15-spined sticklebackCommon prawnCommon shore crabBaked bean ascidianMulletOther (please specify)

    Did you see anything particularly interesting?
    Fish foraging behaviourSpecies seeking refuge in reefOther (please specify)

    Here are some of the species you might be able to spot

    European eel

    © Luke Helmer

    Snake-like elongated fish with one pair of small pectoral fins and cylindrical body.

    Sea bass (European Bass)

    © Luke Helmer

    Sleek streamlined body with distinct silver scales and straight lateral line.

    15-spined stickleback

    © Luke Helmer

    Slender, elongate body narrowing before the tail fin. Brown/Olive body which is paler below with 14-17 spines in front of the dorsal fin.

    Common Prawn

    © Luke Helmer

    Cylindrical body – Usually transparent with brown/yellow/pink stripes, two small claws on the front legs.

    Common shore crab

    © Luke Helmer

    Usually green/brown but juveniles can be orange/red. Carapace has five ‘teeth’ on either side of the eyes.

    Baked bean ascidian

    © Luke Helmer

    Reddish-brown sea squirt, usually with a maximum length of 2 cm and 1.5 cm in diameter.

    Blue Mussel

    © Image: Good Free Photos

    Smooth shell, variable in colour but usually purple/blue and sometimes brown.

    Grey Mullet

    © Roberto Pillon, Chelon labrosus

    Plump, silvery fish with large scales and flat wide mouths. There are three main species found in the UK; Thin-lipped, Thick-lipped, and the smallest, the golden grey mullet.